MAT - Metadata Anonymisation Toolkit


This is a great program used to help protect your privacy.

Metadata consists of information that characterizes data. Metadata is used to provide documentation for data products. In essence, metadata answers who, what, when, where, why, and how about every facet of the data that is being documented.

Metadata within a file can tell a lot about you. Cameras record data about when a picture was taken and what camera was used. Office documents like PDF or Office automatically adds author and company information to documents and spreadsheets.

Maybe you don't want to disclose that information on the web.

MAT can only remove metadata from your files, it does not anonymise their content, nor can it handle watermarking, steganography, or any too custom metadata field/system.

If you really want to be anonymous, use a format that does not contain any metadata, or better yet, use plain-text.

These are the formats supported to some extent:

Portable Network Graphics (PNG)
JPEG (.jpeg, .jpg, ...)
Open Document (.odt, .odx, .ods, ...)
Office Openxml (.docx, .pptx, .xlsx, ...)
Portable Document Fileformat (.pdf)
Tape ARchive (.tar, .tar.bz2, .tar.gz)
ZIP (.zip)
MPEG Audio (.mp3, .mp2, .mp1, .mpa)
Ogg Vorbis (.ogg)
Free Lossless Audio Codec (.flac)
Torrent (.torrent)

The President of the United States and his birth certificate would have greatly benefited from software such as MAT.

You can install MAT with this terminal command:

sudo apt-get install mat

Look for more articles about privacy soon and by searching in our search by under "privacy".

Tasque TODO List App


We're getting back to some of the old basic apps that a lot of people used to use in Ubuntu. Many of them still work great and work great without any internet connection needed.

Tasque (pronounced like “task”) is a simple task management app (TODO list) for the Linux Desktop and Windows. It supports syncing with the online service Remember the Milk or simply storing your tasks locally.

The main window has the ability to complete a task, change the priority, change the name, and change the due date without additional property dialogs.

When a user clicks on a task priority, a list of possible priorities is presented and when selected, the task is re-prioritized in the order you wish.

When you click on the due date, a list of the next seven days is presented along with an option to remove the date or select a date from a calendar.

A user completes a task by clicking the check box on a task. The task is crossed out indicating it is complete and a timer begins counting down to the right of the task. When the timer is done, the task is removed from view.

As mentioned, Tasque has the ability to save tasks locally or backend used Remember the Milk, a free online to-do list. On one of my computers saving my tasks using RTM works great, on my computer at work, it wont sync my tasks. I havent figure out why, but I will post any updates here once I get it working or find a workaround.

You can install Tasque from the Ubuntu Software Center or with this terminal command:

sudo apt-get install tasque

All in all, Tasque is a great little task app. Really simple to use!

Tomboy The Original Note App


When I first started using Ubuntu back in early 2007 (Ubuntu 6.10) I fell in love with a pre-installed app called Tomboy. I had used Tomboy for several years until Ubuntu One notified users it would stop syncing Tomboy a couple years ago, and then the finality of Ubuntu One shutting down earlier this year. I had rushed to find alternatives like Evernote, Gnotes, etc but none of them were simple and easily integrated.

The Tomboy description is as follows... "Tomboy is a simple & easy to use desktop note-taking application for Linux, Unix, Windows, and Mac OS X. Tomboy can help you organize the ideas and information you deal with every day."

Some of Tomboys notable features are highlighting text, inline spell checking, auto-linking web & email addresses, undo/redo, font styling & sizing and bulleted lists.

I am creating new notes as well as manually importing a few of my old notes from a couple years ago. Tomboy used to sync easily with Ubuntu One. Since that is no longer an option, you can do it with your Dropbox folder or your Google Drive folder (I'm using Insync).

Tomboy hasnt been updated in a while, but it installs and works great on Ubuntu 14.04 using:

sudo apt-get install tomboy

When you start Tomboy there will be a little square note icon with pen up on your top bar. Clicking the icon will show you the Tomboy menu options. To sync your notes across your computers you would go to the Tomboy preferences, clicking the Syncronization tab, and pick a local folder in your Dropbox or Google Drive. Thats pretty much it! Start writing those notes! On your other computers that you want to sync your notes, you would select the same sync folder you chose on your first computer.

A few quick points. When you sync your notes, it will create a folder titled "0" in whatever folder you have chosen to sync your notes in.

If you want to launch Tomboy with your system startup (in Ubuntu 14.04) in Unity search for "Startup Applications" and run it. Add a new app titled "Tomboy" with the command "tomboy", save and close. Next time you log on, your Tomboy notes will be ready to use.

Tomboy also works with Windows and Mac OS X and installation instructions can be found here:

Windows ... https://wiki.gnome.org/Apps/Tomboy/Installing/Windows
Mac ... https://wiki.gnome.org/Apps/Tomboy/Installing/Mac

- - - - -

If you are still looking for syncing options, this comes in from Christian....

You can self-host your note sync server with either Rainy or Grauphel...

Learn more here...

http://dynalon.github.io/Rainy/

http://apps.owncloud.com/content/show.php?action=content&content=166654

Ubuntu - 10 Years Strong


Ubuntu, the Debian based linux operating system is approaching its 21st release in just a couple of weeks (October 23rd) moving forward 10 years strong now!

Mark Shuttleworth invests in Ubuntu's parent company Canonical, which continues to lose money year after year. It's clear that profit isn't his main concern. There is still a clear plan for Ubuntu and Canonical. That plan appears to be very much 'cloud' and business based.

Shuttleworth is proud that the vast majority of cloud deployments are based-on Ubuntu. The recent launch of Canonical's 'Cloud in a box' deployable Ubuntu system is another indication where it sees things going.

Ubuntu Touch will soon appear on phones and tablets, which is really the glue for this cloud/mobile/desktop ecosystem. Ubuntu has evolved impressively over the last ten years and it will continue to develop in this new age.

Ubuntu provides a seamless ecosystem for devices deployed to businesses and users alike. Being able to run the identical software on multiple devices and in the cloud, all sharing the same data is very appealing.

Ubuntu will be at the heart of this with or without the survival of Canonical.

"I love technology, and I love economics and I love what’s going on in society. For me, Ubuntu brings those three things together in a unique way." - Mark Shuttleworth on the next 5 years of Ubuntu

BirdFont Font Editor


If you have ever been interested in making your own fonts for fun or profit, BirdFont is an easy to use free font editor that lets you create vector graphics and export TTF, EOT & SVG fonts.

To install Birdfont, simply use the PPA below to insure you always have the most updated version. Open the terminal and run the following commands:

sudo add-apt-repository ppa:ubuntuhandbook1/birdfont

sudo apt-get update

sudo apt-get install birdfont

If you dont like using a PPA repository, you can download the appropriate DEB package  for your particular system....

http://ppa.launchpad.net/ubuntuhandbook1/birdfont/ubuntu/pool/main/b/birdfont/

If you need help developing a font, there is also an official tutorial here!

http://birdfont.org/doku/doku.php/tutorials

Ubuntu Kylin Wallpapers


Looking for some new wallpapers these days? The Chinese version of Ubuntu, Ubuntu Kylin, has some beautiful new wallpapers for the 14.10 release. Download and install the DEB to put them on your computer (a total of 24 wallpapers)...

http://security.ubuntu.com/ubuntu/pool/universe/u/ubuntukylin-wallpapers/ubuntukylin-wallpapers-utopic_14.10.0_all.deb